Month: February 2019

How to Use Your Smartphone to Detect Card Skimmers at Gas Pumps

Card skimmers are small electronic devices that criminals put in gas pumps to steal people’s card information when they pay for gas at the pump. The Texas Department of Agriculture recently released a video about avoiding card skimmers, and one of the most interesting tips was to use your smartphone to check for Bluetooth signals at the pump.

5 Tips to Prevent Card Fraud

Some skimmers use Bluetooth to export the private data from the skimmer to the criminal’s computer or phone.

Here’s how to use your smartphone to check for Bluetooth card skimmers:

  1. Once at the pump, open your phone’s “Settings”
  2. Select “Bluetooth”
  3. Any active Bluetooth devices in range will be listed here. If you see an unfamiliar device identified by a long string of numbers and letters trying to connect, that could be a sign there is a skimmer on the pump.

Here are some other tips for avoiding card skimmers:

  • Pay inside instead of at the pump.
  • If using a card at the pump, use a credit card instead of a debit card because credit cards have more fraud protection in place.
  • If using a debit card, run it as credit instead of entering your pin. If you decide to run it as debit, shield the keypad so no one can see your pin. You can also use MobiMoney to manage your PVNB debit card from your cell phone and even turn your card off remotely.
  • Inspect the pump – look and feel for anything out of place. Some gas stations place security tape over the cabinet to ensure it has not been tampered with.
  • Look for well-lit gas stations and use the pumps closest to the store.
  • Regularly monitor your accounts for unauthorized transactions. PVNB offers real-time transaction notifications and event alerts.

If you believe your card information may have been compromised, contact your bank immediately.

Click Here for Powell Valley National Bank’s Debit Card Support Numbers  

Letters From Leton: Any Sears Boxes in Your Driveway?

It’s not unusual (especially during the Holiday Season) to come home to a box on your porch or in your driveway.

How many of those boxes are from Sears? How many are from Amazon?

Sears and Roebuck began operations in 1893 (five years after your Bank began). Sears was known for its catalog order system and for shipping goods (pots and pans, pre-built houses, etc.) via railroads, the latest in fast paced technology.

Sears used technology to quickly get quality goods at a reasonable price to people throughout the country. Sound familiar?

Later on, as roads developed, Sears built brick-and-mortar stores, and people came to shop there with the catalog being viewed as old fashioned.

Later, a new fast paced technology came along, the internet, and Amazon, not Sears, developed the electronic catalog. Today Amazon is a thriving business, and Sears is near closing.

How could a company that had a catalog system and fast shipping at the heart of its DNA not see the value of an internet-based catalog and shipping system?

The only thing that I can come up with is that Sears became “uppity,” as my dad would say, and felt that they could control the marketplaceThat was a dumb thought!

We should consider the path that Sears has traveled to disaster as a reminder of  failure. We must not think (like Sears) that we are smarter than the market and do not need to adapt our products and services and their delivery. Instead, we must be constantly adapting to improve our products and services, and we must always be considering the best way to deliver them to customers.

– Leton

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“Letters From Leton” is a blog series comprised of the weekly updates that Leton Harding – President, Chairman, and CEO of Powell Valley National Bank, shares with the Bank’s team members. These newsletters are full of uplifting anecdotes and intriguing insights that are applicable beyond the Bank, so we want to share them with you.

Letters from Leton: Scaled to Serve

This month, corporate executives, government leaders, economists, and others gathered in Davos, Switzerland for the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting. That’s a lot of influential folks all in one place talking about what’s going on in the world’s economies.

One morning, Bloomberg Radio aired an interview with Mike Corbat, the Chief Executive Officer of Citibank in New York, one of the world’s largest banks.

During the interview, he discussed how the American banking system is made up of different bank “groups” – like community, regional, and large national banks – and how each bank group is “scaled to serve” different markets.

Mr. Corbat’s comments rang true with me. “Scaled to Serve” means that Powell Valley National Bank is here (as a community bank) to serve our regional community in ways others cannot. The question we need to ask is, “How well do we serve?”

Service to customers is one of the few things any business (including Powell Valley National Bank) can control.

Good Service requires a positive attitude about wanting to work with customers and wanting to solve the problems they may have. Quality service does not mean you have all of the answers – but that you want to help the customer!

This week, I challenge all PVNB employees to evaluate themselves – On a scale of 1 to 10, how would you rate your service to our customers (or fellow employees)? Write that number somewhere on your desk or work station, and next week when you come in, ask yourself: Am I satisfied with this number?

Hopefully this is one time you want to tip the scales to the higher side!

– Leton

____________________________________________________________________
“Letters From Leton” is a blog series comprised of the weekly updates that Leton Harding – President, Chairman, and CEO of Powell Valley National Bank, shares with the Bank’s team members. These newsletters are full of uplifting anecdotes and intriguing insights that are applicable beyond the Bank, so we want to share them with you.